Buffalohair-Jage Press News and Entertainment Magazine / Front Page

360

625434_10151615982298264_969802366_n

Archive of all our old Front Page/ pages and info:)

At Buffalohair-Jage Press B/ http://littlerunningdeer.wordpress.com/

To keep the site active just add lots of New up to date Music videos and Entertainment News Feeds. Then Just Like Magic, Pow! You now have the new Buffalohair Entertainment page.

http://littlerunningdeer.wordpress.com/

Just another up-beat page of our Magazine:)

http://littlerunningdeer.wordpress.com/

Remember NativeVue where alot of the Story Telling Began to be in the publics eye? What happened to those Archives? I saved them for you:)

What has been happening behind the scenes? Yes, We Still are working with our Burma Friends! Are you following their latest News?

Face Book Buffalohair

 

 12990_543809485653464_1105010237_n
 5003351_orig
14332932_10209816711402004_4797911355457613325_n

Digital Smoke Signals was live.

32 mins ·

Oceti resistance prayer camp

Face To Face: Dennis Ward sits down with renowned activist, Winona LaDuke

http://aptnnews.ca/2017/05/16/winona-laduke/



Smithsonian Channel: It’s Brighter Here

Smithsonian Channel brings original programs exploring science, nature, and pop culture to your TV. Find favorites, learn where the newest programming is.

mezzanine_346.jpg.focalcrop.1280x487.50.10

http://www.pbs.org/show/wild-weather/

 

 

 

LIKES:

6 bloggers like this.
Advertisements

56 thoughts on “Buffalohair-Jage Press News and Entertainment Magazine / Front Page

    • Eating Healthy on a Budget: The Plant Paradox Way
      Gundry MD

      Mint Chocolate Chip Ice Cream – (The Plant Paradox Recipe)

    • Oooooops! Non Acid foods when cancer appears is a start of change ……. Then low and behold we learn more about poison plants with their protective protein!!!!!! WHAT ! That are Stamped Healthy ! Yes, but pills from the store shelves, help you keep eating the poison! WHAT Again!

      Popeye’s spinach really was good after all!

      Fluoride in our tap water numbed our thinking that much? Wow! ? TV ads put us into a yummy trance, to trust what they told you to eat as the healthy way? Talk about a plan in motion:(

      Dr. Gundry Shocks Hallmark Hosts with Hidden “Healthy” Food Dangers
      Gundry MD

    • Gundry MD Primal Plants

      why are these ingredients not..organic.?
      asked by michael c. on August 6, 2017

      Showing 1-1 of 1 answers
      Did not want to pay out Ten’s of Thousand of Dollars for a label? In His recipes he mentions some of the foods he uses as being organic but that certain Company paid dearly to get that word ‘organic’ on their package. So he is very aware on that word!
      Ann /JAGE answered on August 7, 2017

  1. Not enough Money to Remodel for the ‘ Art Gallery Opening’ for all the Handicap requirements needed, to get to and from the second floor! Wow! Ouch! A shame really:( What about the parking lot’s slope and ramp walk ways levels, with the proper signs posted for vans?

    It Does have a Special Handicap Bathroom built on the grounds! Hurray for that! The Ware Houses are all with flat large floors at ground level! So that is all good 🙂

    https://annlrd.wordpress.com/2017/07/05/a-going-up-b-going-down/

  2. Antonio Sanchez shared The Bismarck Tribune’s post.
    9 hrs ·

    Myron Dewey NOT GUILTY!
    The Bismarck Tribune
    12 hrs ·

    Criminal charges against a well-known drone operator, who documented the Dakota Access Pipeline protests, were dismissed Monday at the request of the prosecutor.

    • STATE NAMES

      Alabama from the name of the Alibamu or Albaamu Tribe with origins among the Creek meaning town and Choctaw meaning thicket clearers and vegetable gatherers and cutters of medicine plants.

      Alaska from the Aleut word alakshak meaning peninsula or great land.

      *Arizona from the Pima and Papago word arizonac meaning place of small springs or little spring place as well as from the Spanish interpretation of the Aztec arizuma.

      Arkansas from the name of the Quapaw Tribe from other neighboring Native American Nations as well as bad French interpretation of the word acansa meaning downstream place.

      Connecticut from the Mahican word quinnehtukqut meaning beside the long tidal river.

      *Idaho from the area tribes meaning gem of the mountains as told by early settlers of the territory but actually time showed that it was a created word by a mining lobbyist from a possible Shoshone word and possible Plains Apache word idaahe.

      Illinois from the French interpretation of Algonquin Miami iliniwek and ilenweewa meaning warriors and tribe of superior men as well as an adaptation of Odawa ilinouek.

      Indiana meaning Land of Indians as given by the Americans for the many tribes that lived there and that were moved there before Indiana became a state as it was the real first Indian Territory established by the United States.

      Iowa from the name of the Ioway Tribe, but also possible corruption of the word Kiowa as used by the Meswaki Nation for the Tribe that lived south of them on the Iowa River to describe those that wander.

      Kansas from the name of the Kansa or Kaw Tribe meaning people of the south wind.

      Kentucky from the Wyandot word kahtentah and the Lenape word kahntukay and the Haudenosaunee (Iroquois) words kentahten, kantake and ketakeh meaning land of tomorrow describing the area that was a mutual and neutral hunting ground for many Tribes.

      Massachusetts from the Algonquian Narragansett messatossec, massawachusett, and massachuseuck of the Massachusetts Tribe meaning people of the Green Hill.

      Michigan from the Anishinaabe micigana, meicigama or meshi-gami meaning great waters or great lakes.

      Minnesota from the Lakota word minisota meaning sky tinted waters for the many lakes.

      Mississippi from the French interpretation of the Anishinaabe and Algonquin words for the river misissipi, messipi and misiziibi meaning Great River.

      Missouri from the Iliniwek Missouri Tribe wimihsoorita meaning owners of big canoes. Other origins include the Lakota word for the Missouris Tribe meaning town of large canoes or wooden canoe people and even river of the big canoes.

      Nebraska from the Oto word nebrathka, the Omaha-Ponca nbdhaska, and the Ioway-Otoe nbraske meaning flat water or flat river for the Platte River.

      New Mexico from mexitli the Aztec God and named by Spain for its new territories north of the Rio Grande River.

      North Dakota & South Dakota named for the Territory of Dakota from the Dakhota (Dakota) Tribe and possible the Santee dakhota as well as possible Omaha-Ponca dakkudha.

      Ohio from the Haudenosaunee word oheo or ohioway for the confluence of the Alleghany and Ohio Rivers meaning good river and beautiful river.

      Oklahoma from the Choctaw words okla for people and humma for red meaning land of the red people.

      *Oregon from the possible French interpretation of Algonquin Native words wauregan and ouregon for the Oregon River (what would be called the Columbia River) and maybe French word ouaricon-sint for the Wisconsin River.

      Tennessee from the Aniyunwiya (Cherokee) word tenasi or tanasi for the Little Tennessee River and one of their main villages that at one time was the capital of the Nation.

      Texas from a Caddo word teyshas meaning friends or allies.

      Utah for the Ute Tribe meaning high up people and later poorly translated people of the mountains as they were sometimes referred to by the Apache from the word yudah and yuttahih.

      Wisconsin from the Anishinaabe words wishkonsing and miskwasiniing as well as Miami meskonsing with various meanings from red place, red stone place and place of the beaver or has also been attributed to the French interpretation ouisconsin meaning grassy place.

      Wyoming from the Algonquin Lenape word maughwauwama meaning large plains at the big flat river as their word for the Wyoming Territory that reminded them of the same area of the Wyoming Valley in their homeland of Pennsylvania.

      CONCLUSION

      As one can see, this is just another example of our rich Native American Culture in the United States. This greatly extends to names of regions, counties, cities, streets, lakes, mountains, rivers, and so much more. We are a country of Native American word origins.

      This is also just one small study into the linguistics nightmare of a short list of words with Native American origins. One can see that the various ways of pronouncing and spelling a Native American word over time has created much debate on where and when the original names of our states came.

      BIBLIOGRAPHY

      Afable, Patricia O. & Beeler, Madison S. 1996. Place Names. In Languages. Ives Goddard, Ed. Vol. 17 of Handbook of North American Indians. William C. Sturtevant, Ed. Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institution.

      Bright, William. 2004. Native American Place Names of the United States. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press.

      Campbell, Lyle. 1997. American Indian Languages: The Historical Linguistics of Native America. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

      Chamberlain, Alexander F. 1902. Algonkian Words in American English: A Study in the Contact of the White Man and the Indian. The Journal of American Folklore, 15, (59) 240-267.

      Crowley, Terry. 1992. An Introduction to Historical Linguistics. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

      Cutler, Charles L. 1994. O Brave New Words! Native American Loanwords in Current English. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press.
      DeMallie, Raymond J. 2001. Plains. Vol. 13 of Handbook of North American Indians. William C. Sturtevant, Ed. Washington DC: Smithsonian Institution.Flexner, Stuart B. & Hauck, Leonare C. Eds. 1987. The Random House Dictionary of the English Language. New York: Random House.Guyton, Kathy. 2009. U.S. State Names: The Stories of How Our States Were Named. Nederland, CO: Mountain Storm Press.

      LeClaire, Nancy, & Cardinal, George. 1998. Alberta Elders’ Cree Dictionary. Earle Waugh, Ed. Edmonton: U of Alberta Press.

      Nyholm, Earl & Nichols, John D. 1995. A Concise Dictionary of Minnesota Ojibwe. University of Minnesota Press.

      Rankin, Robert. 2005. Quapaw. In Native Languages of the Southeastern United States, eds. Heather K. Hardy & Janine Scancarelli, Eds. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press.

      Rhodes, Richard A. 1985. Eastern Ojibwa-Chippewa-Ottawa Dictionary. Trends in Linguistics Documentation 3. Berlin: Mouton.

      Rhodes, Richard A. 2002. Multiple Assertions, Grammatical Constructions, Lexical Pragmatics, and the Eastern Ojibwa-Chippewa-Ottawa Dictionary. In Making Dictionaries: Preserving Indigenous Languages of the Americas. Frawley, Hill, and Munro, Eds. Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press.

      Sanders, Thomas E., & Walter W. Peck. Eds. 1973. Literature of the American Indian. Berkeley: Glencoe.

      Sturtevant, William C. Ed. 1983. Handbook of North American Indians. Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institution.

      About Jamie K Oxendine

      Jamie K. Oxendine, of the Lumbee Tribe of North Carolina, is the Native American Liaison and Education Consultant for Ohio University in Athens. Ohio. He is also an adjunct professor at the University of Toledo teaching “Indians of North America” and at Lourdes University teaching “Native American Culture” for the Lifelong Learning Center. A frequent speaker on Native American topics, he serves as the director of the Black Swamp InterTribal Foundation in Ohio. As a recording artist, he was three times been nominated for a NAMMY (Native American Music Award).

      View all posts by Jamie K Oxendine

    • Published on May 1, 2017

      The Gulf Stream and The Next Ice Age is about the consequences of global warming on The Great Atlantic Conveyor, which has to do with regulating climate and the fear that the melting of ice will stop it, perhaps triggering an ice age.

    • #areyoureadyforthedarkness ” The power grid is failing across the world ”

      Besides Fracking Etc.
      73 earthquakes hits Switzerland as CERN playing god with the earth ,breaks new particle collision record

  3. TMD Jaw lower left side of jaw:( OUCH!

    A nerve! Not TMD
    http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/trigeminal-neuralgia/home/ovc-20342542

    https://harisingh.com/newsHealth6.htm

    Welcome to
    EqualsHappiness.com

    Aspirin for Heart Attack

    A Health Tip To Remember

    Keep aspirin by your bedside.

    There are other symptoms of an heart attack besides the pain on the left arm. One must also be aware of an intense pain on the chin, as well as nausea and 20 lots of sweating, however these symptoms may also occur less frequently.

    Note: There may be NO pain in the chest during a heart attack. The majority of people (about 60%) who had a heart attack during their sleep, did not wake up. However, if it occurs, the chest pain may wake you up from your deep sleep. If that happens, immediately dissolve two aspirins in your mouth (under your tongue) and swallow them with a bit of water …

    Afterwards:
    Phone a neighbor or a family member who lives very close by.
    Say “heart attack!”
    Say that you have taken 2 aspirins.
    Take a seat on a chair or sofa near the front door, and wait for their arrival and …
    DO NOT LIE DOWN!

    Remember these three letters
    S.T.R.

    Since many people are alone when they suffer a heart attack, this article seemed to be in order. Without help, the person whose heart is beating improperly and who begins to feel faint, has only about 10 seconds left before losing consciousness.

    However, these victims can help themselves by coughing repeatedly and very vigorously. A deep breath should be taken before each cough, and the cough must be deep and prolonged, as when producing sputum from deep inside the chest. A breath and a cough must be repeated about very two seconds without let up until help arrives, or until the heart is felt to be beating normally again.

    Deep breaths get oxygen into the lungs and coughing movements squeeze the heart and keep the blood circulating. The squeezing pressure on the heart also helps it regain normal rhythm. In this way, heart attack victims can get to a hospital. Tell as many other people as possible about this, it could save their lives!

    http://www.doctoroz.com/article/4-body-pains-you-should-never-ignore

    4 Body Pains You Should Never Ignore (0:30)
    MORE FROM THIS EPISODE

    Perhaps you experienced a sharp shooting sensation that you can’t explain, or a dull ache that never quite goes away. These types of pains can be clues to your overall well-being. Even if you’ve had blood work or other forms of testing done that indicated you’re in the clear, your body may be trying to tell you something is wrong. To help you prevent potentially life-threatening situations, Dr. Oz reveals the four body pains you should never ignore.
    From This Episode:
    How Healthy Are You? The 60-Second Test You Can Take at Home

    Jaw Pain: Can Signal a Heart Attack

    A dull, vague pain on the lower left side of your jaw should never be ignored. This pain increases and decreases over the course of a few minutes. In addition, it moves around so you can’t quite pinpoint exactly where it bothers you. Known as “referred pain,” this sensation occurs when the nerves surrounding the heart become agitated, sending pain through the nerves in the spine to other locations in the body, specifically the left jaw, shoulder, and arm.

    LEARN MORE: How to Know If You Might Be Having a Heart Attack

    Dr. Oz’s When to Worry Scale can help you understand the difference between benign jaw pain such as TMJ, a sinus infection, or a toothache, and serious jaw pain associated with a heart attack.

    Green Zone: Lowest Risk

    If moving your jaw around (such as while chewing) increases the pain, it’s likely the discomfort has nothing to do with your heart.

    Yellow Zone: Medium Risk

    Jaw pain that happens in the morning can be an instance of referred pain and serves as a warning sign that you’re at risk for a heart attack. Your blood is thicker at this time of the day, which causes blood pressure to surge, increasing heart attack risk.

    Red Zone: The Highest Risk

    Pain brought on by physical activity can manifest in several areas including the chest, jaw, left arm and shoulder, a scenario that typically indicates you’re having a heart attack. Shortness of breath, a common heart attack symptom in women, may also occur. You may also get additional classic heart attack signs such as dizziness or nausea. In this case, see a doctor immediately.

  4. 10. “Saguaro twist” by Jack Dykinga

    The Sonoran Desert can be a harsh, unrelenting environment for any living thing to grow in, but saguaro cacti find a way. With roots reaching deep underground for water, these incredible plants can live up to 200 years, their branches morphing and twisting into patterns as they age. Photo by Jack Dykinga/Wildlife Photographer of the Year.

    http://www.upworthy.com/13-stunning-photos-that-might-win-the-wildlife-photographer-of-the-year-contest?c=upw1

    • http://www.lostways.org/fb/

      The Lost Ways
      Book

      The Crisis we should all prep for
      is what folks 150 years ago called daily life:

      …no electrical power, no refrigerators, no Internet, no computers, no TV, no hyperactive law enforcement, and no Safeway or Walmart.
      They got things done or else we wouldn’t be here!

      Here’s just a glimpse of what you’ll find in The Lost Ways:

      If you liked our video tutorial on how to make Pemmican, then you’ll love this: I will show you how to make another superfood that our troops were using in the Independence war, and even George Washington ate on several occasions. This food never goes bad. And I’m not talking about honey or vinegar. I’m talking about real food! The awesome part is that you can make this food in just 10 minutes and I’m sure that you already have the ingredients in your house right now.

      You’ll also discover 25 other survival foods that we’ve lost to history.You can bring them back to life and improve your stockpiles, so you’ll never run out of food in a crisis.Or you can spend fun weekends with your family recreating old survival recipes like Mud Apples or Mormon Johnnycake.

      You’ll find out the techniques and methods used by the wise sheriffs from the frontiers to defend an entire village despite being outnumbered and outgunned by gangs of robbers and bandits, and how you can use their wisdom to defend your home against looters when you’ll be surrounded.

      You’ll learn to do when there is no more ammo to be had, how people who wandered the West managed to hunt eight deer with six bullets,and why their supply of ammo never ran out. You’ll master

      “The Art of Poultice.” If you explore the ingredients from which our forefathers made poultices,you’ll be totally surprised by the similarities with modern medicines.

      Well…how would you feel in a crisis to be the only one from the group knowledgeable about this lost skill?

      You’ll learn how Native Americans build the subterranean roundhouse,an underground house that today will serve you as a storm shelter, a perfectly camouflaged hideout, or a bunker.It can easily shelter three to four families, so how will you feel if, when all hell breaks loose, you’ll be able to call all your loved ones and offer them guidance and shelter? Besides that, the subterranean roundhouse makes an awesome root cellar where you can keep all your food and water reserves year-round

      You’ll gain the lost knowledge of sailors from the XVII century who preserved water in their ships for months on end even years and you’ll find out how you can use this method to preserve clean water for your family cost-free.

  5. I already have a lot of Survival camping in woods and canning/ food prep books but thanks Antonio for the link. Amazon customers give it a 1 1/2 star:( Huge book of double spaced words, too huge for a book shelf, for $184.__ Wow!

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s